This page is dedicated to the memory of:



Sapper
C. A. JONES
59 Independent Commando Squadron Royal Engineers


Chris was born on 21st August 1962 in Cinderford, Gloucestershire; he was the middle child of Stanley and Evelyn Jones, and had both an elder sister called Tracey Lorraine, and a younger one named Beverley Donna. His father had served in the Royal Air Force during National Service, as did one of his uncles. Three other uncles had also served in the Army, and his brother-in-law, Alan Phelps (Beverley's husband) was a Royal Marine who was also 'down south' during the Falklands War.

His childhood was a happy one. Chris was educated locally at St. Anthony's School from 1966 to 1973, then moving on to the Double View Secondary until 1978. A keen Cub at junior school, he joined the Army Cadets later on, at the same time representing his school at rugby, cricket and cross-country. He also liked fishing and swimming, and played cricket for a local club. His full-time Army service began in September 1978 at the Army Apprentices College, Chepstow. From there he went to the Corps of Royal Engineers at Chatham, volunteered for Commando training with the Royal Marines, gained his green beret without any problems, and was posted to 59 Independent Commando Squadron in Plymouth.

Chris was serving with 59 when the South Atlantic deployment began in April 1982. By now he had been seconded to 45 Commando RM up in Scotland, and sailed south with them in one of the logistic ships, landing in the Falkland Islands on Friday, May 21st 1982 at Red Beach, San Carlos Water. Chris took part in the long 'yomp' across East Falkland, finally arriving at 45 Cdo's objective, a feature called Two Sisters. On the night of June 11th, the attack began, and at some point during the early hours of the following day, Sapper Jones and three of his Royal Marine colleagues were killed by artillery or mortar fire. His body was taken off the battlefield and temporarily interred at Teal Inlet.

In November, at his parents' request, Chris's remains were brought home to England. He now lies at peace in the Yew Tree Brake cemetery at Cinderford, close to his home, his parents and his school. Many of the people that he grew up with are still in the area. They remember him well, they remember him with pride - and they still miss their friend.